Undergraduate Courses

Generally, students admitted in the Life Sciences and Physical & Mathematical Sciences streams include chemistry in their first year, in addition to physics, math and biology courses. CHM151Y is the course that is strongly recommended for all students who will be following one of the chemistry specialist programs and who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree such as those in chemistry major program. The combination of CHM138H and CHM139H is recommended for students who intend to take programs in the Life or Health Sciences that do not require a large amount of chemistry. It is also the most appropriate course for students applying for entry into professional programs.

The second-year courses introduce the students to their chosen field of studies in biological, physical, organic, inorganic materials and analytical chemistry.

The third-year courses offer the students a wide variety of selection to concentrate on their chosen field of specialization by enhancing their understanding of the chemistry in the lectures and strengthening their practical experience in the labs.

The fourth-year courses cement the student understanding and practical experience to prepare them for employment upon graduation or pursue independent work in graduate studies.

Click on the links below to view the course descriptions. The academic calendar lists the course requirements like pre-requisites, co-requisites and exclusions, and the timetable when the courses are offered.

 


100 Level Courses


 

Title CHM135H Chemistry: Physical Principles (formerly CHM139H)
Schedule

3 lectures
3 (A) labs
1 tutorials

Notes: Offered in Fall and Winter. CHM135H may not be taken with CHM136H in the same session.

Topics This course is recommended for students in the life and health science programs. The course opens with an introduction to atomic theory; fundamental concepts of spectroscopy and chemical bonding are also introduced. After a brief review of reaction stoichiometries, the structure of matter - gases, liquids, solids and beyond - will be discussed. The solution state is then presented with an emphasis on properties of solutions including chemical equilibria in solution, particularly those of acids and bases. The course concludes with an introduction to the kinetics and the thermodynamics of reactions of both chemical and biochemical interest.
Background Exclusions: CHM139H, CHM151Y, CHMA11H3, CHM110H5, CHM140Y5
Pre-requisites: Chemistry SCH4U; Mathematics MHF4U + MCV4U
Co-requisites: MAT(135H, 136H)/135Y/137Y/157Y recommended, but may be required pre-requisite in 2nd year Chemistry courses; PHY(131H, 132H)/(151H, 152H) recommended
Text

Required:

McMurry, Fay, CHEMISTRY with Mastering & Selected Solutions RVP, 7th ed

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Course Spokesperson Fall 2019: Kristine Quinlan, Rm: LM 226, Ph: 416-946-0743
Winter 2020: Scott Browning, Rm: LM 220, Ph: 416-946-7380
Lecturer

Fall 2019
Kristine Quinlan, Rm: LM 226, Ph: 416-946-0743
Eugenia Kumacheva, Rm: LM 627, Ph: 416-978-3576
TBA

Winter 2020
Scott Browning, Rm: LM 220, Ph: 416-946-7380
Mark Wilson, Rm: LM 241A, Ph: 416-978-2946

Course Outline CHM135H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
CHM135H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM136H Introductory Organic Chemistry I (formerly CHM138H)
Schedule

3 lectures
3 (A) labs
1 tutorials

Notes: Offered in Fall & Winter. CHM135H may not be taken with CHM136H in the same session.

Topics This course is recommended for students in the life and health science programs. The course commences with a review of fundamental principles in covalent bonding to understand the structure and shape of organic molecules; the concepts of molecular conformation as well as the "handedness" of shape are introduced. The relationship between the structure of organic molecules and their reactivity is then presented. This relationship will be illustrated by examining the mechanisms by which the organic chemistry of alkenes, alkyl halides and alcohols takes place. The role of acid/base chemistry in these reactions is presented throughout.
Background Exclusions: CHM138H, CHM151Y, CHM242H5, CHMB41H3
Pre-requisites: Chemistry SCH4U; Mathematics MHF4U + MCV4U
Co-requisites: MAT135H/135Y/137Y/157Y recommended, but may be required pre-requisite in 2nd year Chemistry courses; PHY(131H, 132H)/(151H, 152H) recommended.
Text

Required:

J. McMurry, ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 9th ed, Brooks/Cole, 2015 (plus accompaying Study Guide, Solutions Manual and Organic flashware) 8th edition will be supported.

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee
Course Spokesperson C. Scott Browning, Rm: LM 220, Ph: 416-946-7380
Kristine Quinlan, Rm: LM 226, Ph: 416-946-0743
Lecturer

Fall 2019
Scott Browning, Rm: LM 220, Ph: 416-946-7380
Mark Nitz, Rm: DB 459, Ph: 416-946-0640
Sophie Rousseaux, Rm: DB 475, Ph: 416-978-4198

Winter 2020
Kristine Quinlan, Rm: LM 226, Ph: 416-946-0743
Barb Morra, Rm: LM 114, Ph: 416-978-3686
TBA

Lab Instructor TBA
Course Outline CHM136H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
CHM136H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Course Weblink Course Info
Title CHM151Y Chemistry: The Molecular Science
Schedule 3 lectures
3.5 labs
1 tutorials
Topics The first section of the course is an intensive study of the principles of structure and reactions of organic molecules, as well as an introduction to the importance of organic molecules in biological processes. The next section introduces methods of structure determination, and the properties and uses of inorganic elements including novel materials and catalysts. Finally, the last section covers the physical chemical principles that underlie molecular structure, reactivity and energy.

The laboratory provides an introduction to important chemical techniques as well as practical illustrations of lecture material. It consists of several experiments over the year and provides experience in physical chemistry, organic and inorganic chemical reactions.

An added distinguishing feature of CHM151Y is that we assume a knowledge of introductory organic chemistry as outlined in the Ontario Grade 12 curriculum, more specifically the first three chapters of "Organic Chemistry" by J. McMurry, the required organic chemistry text for the course.

Background Exclusions: CHM135H, CHM136H, CHM138H, CHM139H, CHMA10H3, CHMA11H3, CHMB41H3, CHM110H5, CHM120H5
Pre-requisites: Chemistry SCH4U, Mathematics MHF4U + MCV4U; Physics SPH4U recommended
Co-requisites: PHY(131H, 132H)/(151H, 152H) recommended, but may be required pre-requisite in 2nd year courses; MAT(135H, 136H)/137Y/157Y
Text

Required:

TBA

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Scott Browning, Rm: LM 220, Ph: 416-946-7380
Mark Lautens, Rm: DB 359, Ph: 416-978-6083
Gilbert Walker, Rm: LM 145, Ph: 416-946-8401
Lab Instructor

Fall 2019
Andrew Dicks, Rm: LM 151, Ph: 416-946-8003

Winter 2020
TBA

Course Outline CHM151Y1 - OUTLINE - Fall Winter 2017-18.pdf
Title PMU199H Great Discoveries and Grand Challenges in Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics The stories of how great discoveries in chemistry came about vary widely but are always fascinating. This course will explore both how great discoveries have come about and how chemists seek to provide tools to address the grand challenges of today. Specific topics vary each year. Sample topics include the local Nobel-prize winning discovery of insulin, the power of new materials, chemists’ role in the discovery of the ozone hole and chemistry-enabled strategies to address our planet’s energy needs. Through this seminar course, students will develop an appreciation for the power of chemistry and the scientific method.
Lecturer Ronald Kluger, Rm: DB 444, Ph: 416-978-3582
Title PMU199H Climate Change
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Recently, the news reported that the ice caps have melted to their lowest areas ever. Such stories appear in the news from time to time, and one can not help but wonder - is this due to climate change? What are the evidence and arguments for and against climate change generally? What exactly are the predicted consequences? What are the potential challenges and opportunities from the point of view of science, technology, economy, politics, society, etc? In this course, we will learn about how to critically appraise information and how to use the scientific method; and then we will use these tools as well as the scientific and non-scientific literature to explore these and other related topics from a non-scientist's perspective.
Text

Required:

A. Dessler, INTRODUCTION TO MODERN CLIMATE CHANGE

Lecturer Al-Amin Dhirani, Rm: LM 254, Ph: 416-946-5789
Title PMU199H Chiral Drugs and Catalysts
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Life without chirality is unimaginable. From the simplest forms of life to humans we all share the same basic chiral building blocks of life including amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). Understanding the origin of life would not be complete without understanding homochirality of amino acids in life. This course will start with fundamental concepts of chirality and advance to origin of chirality in life and case studies of chiral drugs and chiral catalysts. Some examples of how chiral drugs and catalysts are prepared and how they work will be discussed.
Lecturer Jik Chin, Rm: DB 462, Ph: 416-946-7335 / fax 416-978-7113
Title TBB199H Innovative Teaching Methods in Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Good teaching is effective communication that engages the audience. Innovative methods, by definition, are engaging. To ensure that they also communicate effectively, we'll investigate the nature of science, how scientific knowledge is built, and what makes certain concepts in science problematic to the learner. We will then synthesize our understanding to develop communication tools for engaging our learners and communicating scientific ideas effectively. Students will read and discuss relevant articles in newsmagazines, popular science sources, and the educational literature. They will design and deliver mini lessons to communicate specified scientific concepts. As a major course project, students will eventually develop a communication tool that integrates pedagogical know-how with leading edge chemical discoveries to produce an accessible teaching unit that can be used by Ontario teachers.
Lecturer Cecilia Kutas, Rm: LM 221, Ph: 416-978-8796

 


200 Level Courses


 

Title CHM209H Chemistry of Molecular Gastronomy
Schedule 1 lectures
Topics Examines the fundamental chemical and physical processes that occur during the manipulation of edible molecules, and the resulting molecular transformations that produce different tastes and textures. Concepts will be considered through the lens of the modern practices of molecular gastronomy. This course is designed for students in humanities or social science programs.
Background Exclusions: CHM135H1/CHM136H1/CHM138H1/CHM139H1/CHM151Y1
Text

Recommended:

The Science of Cooking: Understanding the Biology and Chemistry Behind Food and Cooking, First Edition. Joseph J. Provost, Keri L. Colabroy, Brenda S. Kelly, and Mark A.Wallert. ISBN: 9781118674208

A no-cost online version is available through the U of T site license with the publisher.

Lecturer Deborah Zamble, Rm: DB 443, Ph: 416-978-3568
Course Outline CHM209H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM210H Chemistry of Environmental Change
Schedule 2 lectures
1 tutorials
Topics This course will examine the fundamental chemical processes of the Earth's natural environment, and changes induced by human activity. Topics relate to the atmosphere: urban air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain; the hydrosphere: water resources and pollution, wastewater analysis; biogeochemistry and inorganic metals in the environment.
Background Exclusions: ENV235Y
Pre-requisites: CHM135H/CHM139H/CHM151Y, (MAT135H, MAT136H)/MAT137Y/MAT157Y
Text

Required:

Baird and Cann, ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY, 5th ed, Freeman

Lecturer Jennifer Murphy, Rm: LM248, Ph: 416-946-0260
Course Outline CHM210H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM217H Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
Course Notes CHM217H Course Notes
Schedule 2.5 lectures
4 labs
1(A) tutorials
Topics The process of chemical measurement from sampling through analysis to the interpretation of results. Students will learn about the use of standards, methods of calibration, the statistical treatment of results, the significance of numerical values, choosing an appropriate method of analysis, and basic principles of good laboratory practice. Experiments will be drawn from important areas such as water quality, pharmaceuticals, and food & drink. A variety of techniques will be introduced, including volumetric analysis, potentiometry, spectrophotometry, spectrofluorometry, flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and various forms of chromatography. Please see the course web site for more details.
Background Exclusions: CHM211H5, CHMB16H3
Pre-requisites: CHM(135H/139H, 136H/138H)/CHM 151Y with a minimum grade of 63%; (MAT135H, MAT136H)/MAT137Y/MAT157Y.
Text

Required:

Skoog, West, Holler & Crouch, FUNDAMENTALS OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 9th ed, Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning, print or electronic format. (plus Solutions Manual) ISBN: 1-285-56816-8

Recommended:

Student solution manual for the required text D. Brynn Hibbert and J. Justin Gooding, DATA ANALYSIS FOR CHEMISTRY, (Paperback) Oxford

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer David Stone, Rm: LM 218, Ph: 416-946-0293
Lab Instructor David Stone, Rm: LM 218, Ph: 416-946-0293
Course Outline CHM217H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM220H Physical Chemistry for Life Sciences
Schedule 3 lectures
1 tutorials
Topics Introduction to thermodynamics; kinetics; phase equilibrium, properties of mixtures, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry; introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. This course is recommended for students in life and health science programs that involve a small amount of chemistry. Students enrolled in any chemistry specialist program (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program), are strongly encouraged to take CHM222H1 and CHM223H1.
Background Exclusions: CHM225Y1, CHM222H1, JCP221H5/CHM221H5, CHMB20H3
Pre-requisites: CHM(135H/139H, 136H/138H)/151Y; MAT(135H, 136H)/137Y/157Y
Co-requisites: Recommended: MAT235Y/237Y
Text

Required:

R. Chang, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY FOR THE CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, University Science Books, 3rd ed, 2000

Lecturer Raymond Kapral, Rm: LM 421C, Ph: 416-978-6106
G. Andrew Woolley, Rm: LM 526, Ph: 416-978-0675
Course Outline CHM220H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM222H Introduction to Physical Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
1 tutorials
Topics This course provides an introduction to the physical principles which explain and predict the behaviour of atoms and molecules. Topics include introductory thermodynamics; chemical equilibrium; chemical kinetics; introductory quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Lectures will be designed to teach the mathematics used in the course.
Background Exclusions: CHM220H1, CHM225Y1, CHMB20H3, CHM221H5, JCP221H5
Pre-requisites: CHM(135H/139H, 136H/138H)/151Y with a minimum grade of 63%; MAT(135H, 136H)/137Y/157Y; PHY(131H, 132H)/(151H, 152H)
Co-requisites: MAT235Y/237Y
Text

Required:

I. Levine, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY, 6th ed., 2009 McGraw-Hill

Lecturer Jeremy Schofield, Rm: LM 420E, Ph: 416-978-4376
Course Outline CHM222H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM223H Physical Chemistry: The Molecular Viewpoint
Schedule 2 lectures
1 tutorials
Topics This course is intended as a continuation of CHM222H for students wishing to take some additional material in Physical Chemistry. The course covers topics in quantum mechanics and spectroscopy as well as an introduction to reaction kinetics.
Background Exclusions: CHM225Y1, CHM221H1, CHMB21H3
Pre-requisites: CHM220H1 with a minimum grade of B, or CHM222H1.
Co-requisites: MAT235Y/237Y recommended, but may be required for pre-requisite in 3rd year Chemistry courses
Text

Recommended:

I. Levine, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY, 6th ed., 2009 McGraw-Hill

Lecturer Dvira Segal, Rm: LM 420D, Ph: 416-946-0559
Course Outline CHM223H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM238Y Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry
Course Notes CHM238Y Course Notes
Schedule 2 lectures
4 (A) labs
Topics The aim of this course is to give students an introduction to modern inorganic chemistry. It is the first part (with CHM338F) of a two-year sequence in Inorganic Chemistry. The course will build on the concepts introduced in the first year, so that CHM(138H, 139H)/151Y (or equivalent) is an essential prerequisite. The student must have obtained a minimum grade of 63% on those courses, or permission from the department to take this course. Current or previous enrolment in CHM247H/249H is also recommended.

The course will introduce the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry. It will begin with a series of case studies through which important principles of inorganic chemistry will be presented. These will include a brief review of pertinent aspects of atomic structure, an introduction to inorganic synthesis, electron counting and redox processes as well as the use of symmetry to describe the shapes of inorganic molecules. Theories of bonding in inorganic molecules using both the valence bond and molecular orbital approaches will be presented. These ideas will be extended to understand the structure, bonding and properties of metallic and ionic solids. The diversity of chemistry to be found among the main group and transition elements will then be highlighted. Fundamental reactions and structures of main group compounds will be examined and contrasted with the coordination and organometallic chemistry of the transition metal elements. Lastly, the synthesis and structure of solid state materials will be discussed, building upon material presented earlier in the course. The formation and properties of cages, clusters, rings, polymers and novel solids constructed from inorganic substances will be highlighted. Technologically important aspects of the chemistry of the inorganic elements will be described throughout the course.

It is imperative that each student enroll with the Department for his/her CHM 238Y laboratory class during the week-long registration period just prior to the beginning of the Fall term in September. Laboratory class lists will be posted before the start of the Fall session. Students are responsible for checking these lists and reporting errors or omissions to the lab instructor.

Background Exclusions: CHM231H5
Pre-requisites: CHM151Y1/(135H/139H1, 136H/138H1) with a minimum grade of 63%.
Text Required:C.E. Housecroft and A.G. Sharpe, INORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 4/E, Prentice Hall, 2012 ISBN-10: 0273742752 ISBN-13: 9780273742753 L. Smart and E. Moore, SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY, AN INTRODUCTION, 4th ed., CRC Press (Winter session) Reference: J. E. Huheey, INORGANIC CHEMISTRY: PRINCIPLES OF STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY, 4th ed., Harper and Row, 1993
Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Scott Browning, Rm: LM 220, Ph: 416-946-7380
John Debackere, Rm: LM 223, Ph: 416-946-3743
Robert Morris, Rm: DB 344, Ph: 416-978-6962
Lab Instructor John Debackere, Rm: LM 223, Ph: 416-946-3743
Course Outline CHM238Y - OUTLINE - Fall Winter 2017-18.pdf
Title CHM247H Introductory Organic Chemistry II
Schedule 3 lectures
3.5 labs
Notes: Note: Offered in Fall and Winter terms
Topics The fundamentals of organic chemistry with a focus on major reactions of organic compounds. Included are principles of mechanisms, synthesis, and spectroscopy.
Background Exclusions: CHM249H1, CHM243H5, CHMB42H3
Pre-requisites: CHM(135H/139H, 136H/138H)/151Y
Text Required:J. McMurry, ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 9th ed, Brooks/Cole, 2012 (plus accompanying Study Guide and Solutions Manual) Recommended: Darling Models, MOLECULAR VISIONS KIT #1
Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Andrew Dicks, Rm: LM 118, Ph: 416-946-8003
Mitchell Winnik, Rm: LM 520, Ph: 416-978-6495 / fax 416-978-0541
 
Lab Instructor TBA
Course Outline CHM247H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
CHM247H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Course Weblink Course Info
Title CHM249H Organic Chemistry
Schedule 3 lectures
4 labs
Topics This course provides a basic knowledge of the concepts of organic chemistry with an emphasis on the reactivity patterns of various functional groups, the mechanism of chemical reactions and the application of chemical reactions to the synthesis of useful products. The material is directed toward students whose main interest is in chemistry or a chemically related science. Problems will be assigned but not graded. All material presented during lectures could appear on tests or the final exam which will cover the entire course.
Background Exclusions: CHM247H1, CHM243H5, CHMB42H3
Pre-requisites: CHM151Y/(135H/139H, 136H/138H) with a minimum grade of 63%.
Text

Required:

J. McMurry, ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 9th ed, Brooks/Cole, (plus accompanying Study Guide and Solutions Manual)

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Mark Taylor, Rm: LM 622A, Ph: 416-946-0571
Lab Instructor TBA
Title CHM299Y Research Opportunity Program
Topics The Research Opportunity Program (ROP) provides an opportunity for students in their second year (i.e., after completing at least four but not more than nine courses) to earn one 299Y course credit by participating in a faculty member's research project.

Students wishing to apply for places in the ROP should submit ROP Application Forms to the ROP Office by mid March at the latest. Students will be informed in early May whether or not they have been accepted. Successful applicants will be registered in their 299Y course by the Program Office. The 299Y courses begin in September.

Students will be expected to keep a journal recording meetings, progress, and what was learned about the project in particular and the nature of research in general.

For more information about this research opportunity, please go to Research Opportunity Program, or contact the ROP Office at SS2133 Sidney Smith Hall, 416-978-0359.

Course Weblink Course Info

 


300 Level Courses


 

Title CHM310H Environmental Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Overall, the goal of this class will be to present the major chemical pollutants and their sources, the environmental reactions they undergo, and how they become distributed throughout the environment. Topics will include considering carbon-containing molecules in the environment from a variety of perspectives: the carbon cycle, climate change and ocean acidification; fossil fuels and alternative energy sources; and the partitioning and degradation pathways of organic chemicals.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM(135H/139H, 136H/138H)/CHM151Y, MAT(135H, 136H)/MAT137Y/MAT157Y.
Text

Required:

TBA

Lecturer Jonathan Abbatt, Rm: LM 324, Ph: 416-946-7358
Title CHM317H Introduction to Instrumental Methods of Analysis
Course Notes CHM317H Course Notes
Schedule 2 lectures
4 labs
Topics CHM317S continues to cover the principles of instrumental analytical chemistry, first introduced with respect to absorption spectroscopy in CHM217F. The course will begin by reviewing the scope of use of instruments in chemical analysis and the theory and applications of ultraviolet/visible, infrared and atomic absorption spectroscopy.
Further techniques to be discussed will be Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; Raman spectroscopy; spectrofluorimetry; X-ray fluorescence; mass spectrometry and ion sources for mass spectrometry; the gas chromatography - mass spectroscopy interface; principles of surface characterization, vacuum ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; Auger electron emission spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry; separation techniques including gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. In all these topics selected applications will be outlined in addition to the basic theory and instrumentation.
Background Exclusions: CHM391H5, CHMC11H3, CHMC16H3
Pre-requisites: CHM217H with a minimum grade of 63%; MAT(135H, 136H)/MAT137Y/MAT157Y
Recommended preparation: (CHM220H/222H,CHM221H/223H)/CHM225Y
Text

Required:

Skoog, Holler and Crouch, PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS, 7th ed., CENGAGE

Learning *note* If you have the 6th edition this will also be acceptable.

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Rebecca Jockusch, Rm: LM 253, Ph: 416-946-7198
Lab Instructor David Stone, Rm: LM 218, Ph: 416-946-0293
Course Outline CHM317H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM325H Introduction to Inorganic and Polymer Materials Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Materials chemistry involves the study of the synthesis, properties, and applications of solid state and polymeric materials and represents a rapidly growing field. This introductory course is fashioned to illustrate how inorganic and organic polymer and solid state chemistry can be rationally used to synthesize superconductors, metals, semiconductors, ceramics, elastomers, thermo-plastics, thermosets, and polymer liquid crystals, with properties that can be tailored for applications in a range of advanced technologies. Coverage will be fairly broad and is organized to crosscut many aspects of the field.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM220H/222H/225Y, CHM238Y, CHM247H/249H
Text

Required:

L. Smart and E. Moore, SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY, AN INTRODUCTION, 4th ed., CRC Press

Reference:

A.R. West, SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY AND ITS APPLICATIONS, Wiley, 1997

P.A. Cox, THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY OF SOLIDS, Oxford University Press, 1987

P.C. Painter and M.M. Coleman, ESSENTIALS OF POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, May 2008, ISBN 978-1-932078-75-6

Lecturer Eugenia Kumacheva, Rm: LM 627, Ph: 416-978-3576
TBA
Title CHM326H Introductory Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics This course introduces the postulates of quantum mechanics to develop the fundamental framework of quantum theory. A number of exactly soluble problems are treated in detail as examples. Perturbation theory is introduced in the context of understanding many body problems. Various applications to molecular spectroscopy and dynamics are covered in detail.
Background Exclusions: JCP321H5
Pre-requisites: CHM225Y/(CHM220H/222H, 221H/223H), MAT235Y/237Y
Text

Required:

I. Levine, QUANTUM CHEMISTRY, 7th ed. Prentice Hall, 2009 (including Solution Manual) ISBN 0132090856 McQuarrie's Quantum Chemistry (Rev. 2nd Ed., 2007), from University Science Book ISBN 978-1-891389-50-4

Lecturer Mark Wilson, Rm: LM 241A, Ph: 416-978-2946
Course Outline CHM326H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM327H Experimental Physical Chemistry
Schedule 1 lectures
4 labs
Topics Students are exposed to experiments to help them experience modern physical chemistry. Labs designed to illustrate physical chemistry principles and practical techniques as well as their real world state or the art applications. The course also involves some lecture material to broaden the laboratory experience
Background Pre-requisites: CHM225Y/(CHM220H/222H, 221H/223H) with a minimum grade of 63%.
Co-requisites: Recommended: CHM326H or CHM328H
Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer M. Cynthia Goh, Rm: LM 522, Ph: 416-978-6254
Lab Instructor M. Cynthia Goh, Rm: LM 522, Ph: 416-978-6254
Course Outline CHM327H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM328H Modern Physical Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics In this continuation of CHM222H, more advanced topics in thermodynamics such as non-ideal effects are discussed. Statistical mechanics and its application to chemical problems are introduced. Reaction dynamics are analyzed from a fundamental perspective.
Background Exclusions: JCP322H5, CHMC20H3
Pre-requisites: CHM225Y/CHM(220H/222H, 221H/223H), MAT235Y/237Y
Text

Recommended:

I. Levine, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY, McGraw-Hill

Lecturer Jeremy Schofield, Rm: LM 420E, Ph: 416-978-4376
Course Outline CHM328H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM338H Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
Course Notes CHM338H Course Notes
Schedule 2 lectures
4 labs
Topics Main group chemistry, spectroscopy of metal complexes, reaction mechanisms of d-block complexes, d block organometallic complexes, catalysis, introduction to bioinorganic chemistry.

It is imperative that each student complete on-line enrolment for his/her laboratory section during the registration period (see weblink below). Laboratory class lists will be posted on the first day of classes. Students are responsible for checking these lists and reporting errors or omissions to the lab instructor.

Background Exclusions: CHM331H5
Pre-requisites: CHM238Y with a minimum grade of 63%.
Recommended: CHM217H, 247H/249H
Text

Required:

C.E. Housecroft and A.G. Sharpe, INORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 4/E, Prentice Hall, 2012 ISBN-10: 0273742752 ISBN-13: 9780273742753

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Doug Stephan, Rm: DB 465, Ph: 416-946-3294
Lab Instructor John Debackere, Rm: LM 223, Ph: 416-946-3743
Course Outline CHM338H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM342H Modern Organic Synthesis
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics This course provides an overview of the key reaction classes as they relate to reactivity, selectivity and utility in the synthesis of organic molecules. We will begin by reviewing key concepts from early courses in organic chemistry, move on to discuss different types of selectivity, retrosynthesis and devote most of our time to learning new reactions that will be used to make increasingly complex natural products and bioactive compounds with medicinally interesting properties.
Background Exclusions: CHM345H5
Pre-requisites: CHM247H/249H
Text

Required:

Clayden et al., ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, Oxford Press 2004, ISBN 0198503466 (1st or 2nd ed)

Lecturer Robert Batey, Rm: DB 365, 151, Ph: 416-978-5059, 416-978-3566
Title CHM343H Organic Synthesis Techniques
Schedule 2 lectures
4 labs
Topics This laboratory course showcases modern organic synthesis techniques and introduces chemical research principles. It provides excellent preparation for a CHM499Y project in organic chemistry. Associated lectures tech theory and problem-solving approaches from a practical perspective.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM247H/249H with minimum grade of 63%.
Text

Recommended:

Clayden et al., ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, Oxford Press 2004, ISBN 0198503466

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Sophie Rousseaux, Rm: DB 475, Ph: 416-978-4198
Lab Instructor Andrew P. Dicks, Rm: LM 118, Ph: 416-946-8003
Course Outline CHM343H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM347H Organic Chemistry of Biological Compounds
Schedule 3 lectures
Topics Structure, reactions, analysis, and chemical synthesis of important biomolecules based on modern concepts of organic chemistry. Advanced stereochemistry, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, phosphate esters, nucleotides and nucleic acids, co-enzymes and vitamins.
Background Exclusions: CHM347H5, CHMC47H3
Pre-requisites: CHM247H/249H
CHM217H Recommended
Text

Required:

J. McMurry, ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 8th ed, Brooks/Cole, 2012

Recommended:

J. McMurry, STUDY GUIDE AND SOLUTIONS TO ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 8th ed., Brooks/Cole Darling Models, MOLECULAR VISIONS KIT #1

Lecturer Jik Chin, Rm: DB 462, Ph: 416-946-7335 / fax 416-978-7113
Course Outline CHM347H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Course Weblink Course Info
Title CHM348H Organic Reaction Mechanisms
Schedule 2 lectures
4 labs
Topics This course provides a comprehensive overview of one of the most fascinating aspects of modern chemistry the logic and mechanistic basis for understanding the chemical transformations of organic molecules. The main goal of this course is to teach problem solving techniques related to such transformations from a mechanistic point of view. This endeavor is particularly relevant at the beginning of ones 3rd year of undergraduate studies as it provides a much needed support for the overwhelming amount of factual information one receives in prior organic chemistry course(s). The lecture material is divided into three broad, but interrelated, parts: (a) energetics, kinetics, and investigation of mechanism; (b) polar reactions, and (d) pericyclic reactions. The chemistry of reactive intermediates involved in the corresponding reactions will be discussed throughout the course. The students will also be exposed to laboratory experiments that will provide practical insights into selected topics covered in the course of this semester. As a result, the students will receive a thorough preparation for subsequent classes in synthetic organic and organic chemistry by developing skills needed for understanding the reactivity of organic molecules.
Background Exclusions: CHM341H5, CHMC41H3
Pre-requisites: CHM247H/249H with a minimum grade of 63%.
Text

Required:

Francis A. Carey, Richard J. Sundberg, ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY: PART A: STRUCTURE AND MECHANISMS, 5th ed. 2007, Softcover

A no-cost online version is available through the U of T site license with the publisher at Laboratory Manual (sold in the course lab)

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Ronald Kluger, Rm: DB 444, Ph: 416-978-3582
Lab Instructor Andrew Dicks, Rm: LM 151, Ph: 416-946-8003
Course Outline CHM348H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Course Weblink Course Info
Title CHM379H Biomolecular Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
4 labs
Topics This course provides an opportunity to learn core biological chemistry techniques in a laboratory setting. The progression of the lab material will model a research investigation into the structure/function relationship of an enzyme. Students will work in small teams and have an opportunity to use state-of-the art equipment. Each team will prepare and characterize a different mutant of the same enzyme. At the end of the course, the data from all the mutants will be analyzed and the correlation between the chemical structure and mechanism of action of the enzyme will be discussed. Techniques that will be used include PCR mutagenesis, recombinant protein expression, column chromatography, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, mass spectrometry, and computer modeling. The lecture material will provide the theory behind the laboratory experiments, and place the techniques within the context of modern biological chemistry applications.
Background Exclusions: BCH370H, BCH371H, CHM371H5
Pre-requisites: (CHM247H/249H with a minimum grade of 63%), CHM347H, BCH210H
Recommended: CHM217H
Text

Recommended:

Voet and Voet, BIOCHEMISTRY, 4th ed, 2011, Wiley

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer G. Andrew Woolley, Rm: LM 526, Ph: 416-978-0675
Lab Instructor G. Andrew Woolley, Rm: LM 526, Ph: 416-978-0675
Course Outline CHM379H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title JSC301H Principles and Practices in Science Education
Course Notes JSC301H Course Notes
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Fundamental principles and practices in education and public outreach in the sciences, mathematics, and engineering, including education research, curriculum, teaching, and assessment. Students will learn and apply effective strategies which engage and educate learners at the K-16 and public level. The course assignments include a project and/or placement experience.
Lecturer David Stone, Rm: LM 218, Ph: 416-946-0293

 


400 Level Courses


 

Title CHM410H Analytical Environmental Chemistry
Schedule 2 lectures
3.5 labs
Topics CHM410H is an analytical theory, instrumental, and methodology course focused on the measurement of trace concentrations of pollutants in soil, water, air, and biological tissues. The course will begin with techniques involved with obtaining a representative sample, data analysis and handling, and a detailed look at sample preparation (extraction, clean-up, concentration, derivitization) which will be followed by extensive theory and application of the techniques of gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, immunochemistry, atomic spectrophotometry, electrochemistry, and mass spectrometry. Discussion sessions will pursue integrative material. Lab sessions will allow students to directly apply lecture material in hands-on experimentation using all the modern analytical instrumentation utilized in modern measurement science. The lab sessions will utilize the new ANALEST facility featuring state-of-the-art gas, liquid, and ion chromatographs, atomic absorption, and inductively coupled plasma emission (ICP) spectrophotometry. Students will be involved in field measurements as part of the laboratory exercise.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM217H, CHM210H/310H
Recommended: CHM317H
Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Hui Peng, Rm: LM 321A, Ph: 416-978-3596
Lab Instructor TBA
Course Outline CHM410H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM414H Biosensors and Chemical Sensors (Graduate Course: CHM 1102F)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics This course concerns current research and advances in analytical chemistry. There will be a strong emphasis on the principles of chemical and biological sensor technology, including different transduction mechanisms, device architectures and the necessary theoretical background material. Specific devices include electrochemical, optical (fiber-optic and surface plasmon resonance) and acoustic wave sensors. The use of molecular recognition and the chemical modification of transducer interfaces to achieve chemical selectivity (including biological, biomimetic, polymeric, self-assembled monolayer and synthetic host-guest systems) will be discussed, together with appropriate methods for surface characterization and analysis. Other topics will include flow injection and microfluidics technologies, chemometric techniques, and the so-called "electronic nose".
Background Exclusions: CHM414H5
Pre-requisites: CHM217H/220H/222H/225Y
Recommended: CHM317H
Text

Required:

There is no specific text for this course. Instead, students will be provided with references to relevant articles and reviews in the primary scientific literature as well as additional material provided during the course. Students having the CHM317H course text are recommended to retain it for background reading. The course includes a tutorial workshop on literature searching and electronic journal databases.

Lecturer Michael Thompson, Rm: LM 139, Ph: 416-978-3575
Course Outline CHM414H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM415H Topics in Atmospheric Chemistry (Graduate course: CHM 1415H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics This course builds upon the introductory understanding of atmospheric chemistry provided in CHM210H. In particular, modern research topics in the field are discussed, such as aerosol chemistry and formation mechanisms, tropospheric halogen chemistry, the chemistry of climate including cloud formation and geoengineering, biosphere-atmosphere interactions, the chemistry of remote environments, air pollution health effects. Reading is from the scientific literature; class discussion and presentations are emphasized.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM220H/222H/225Y,CHM210H
Recommended: PHY138Y/140Y/(131H, 132H)/(151H, 152H)
Text

Required:

TBA

Lecturer Jonathan Abbatt, Rm: LM 324, Ph: 416-946-7358
Title CHM416H Separation Science (Graduate course: CHM1104H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics This course is intended as an extension of the material dealt with in CHM317H. Initial discussion will focus on the scope of separation technology of all kinds in chemistry in general and analytical chemistry in particular. Areas considered will include precipitation, fractionation, extraction techniques and a detailed consideration of a unified theory of separation. Thin layer, gas and liquid chromatographies will be reviewed, and advanced methods and techniques described. Other topics will include: ion, size exclusion, supercritical fluid and affinity chromatographies: gel and capillary electrophoresis; field flow techniques; and various extraction methodologies (liquid-liquid, solid phase, supercritical fluid). While examples will be drawn from a variety of sources, the emphasis will be on biological and biochemical applications.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM317H
Text

Required:

Skoog, Holler and Crouch, PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS, 7th ed., CENGAGE Learning *note* If you have the 6th edition this will also be acceptable.

Introduction to Modern Liquid Chromatography, Snyder, Kirkland, Dolan, 3rd Edition (Wiley) A no-cost online version is available through the U of T site license with the publisher.

Lecturer Aaron Wheeler, Rm: LM 629A, Ph: 416-946-3864 / fax 416-946-3865
Course Outline CHM416H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM417H Laboratory Instrumentation (Graduate Course CHM1106H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Notes: 10 hours of lab; schedule TBD
Topics This course provides an introduction to building and using optics- and electronics-based instrumentation for laboratory research, as well as for implementing custom software control. Lecture topics include passive electronic components, diodes and transistors, operational amplifiers, light sources and detectors, reflectors, refractors, polarizers, and diffractors, LabView programming and many others. Lectures are supplemented by laboratories in which students work in teams to build fluorescent detection systems for chromatography over the course of several weeks.
Background Pre-requisites: Recommended: CHM317H.
Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Aaron Wheeler, Rm: LM 629A, Ph: 416-946-3864 / fax 416-946-3865
Course Outline CHM417H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM423H Applications of Quantum Mechanics
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics The topics that will be discussed in this course include stationary and time-dependent perturbation theory, WKB approximation and the classical limit, pulsed laser spectroscopies.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM326H
Recommended: MAT223H
Text

Required:

D. Tannor, INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS: A TIME-DEPENDENT PERSPECTIVE, University Science Books, Sausalito 2007

Recommended:

B.H. Bransden and C.J. Joachain, QUANTUM MECHANICS, 2nd ed, Prentice Hall

D. Bohm, QUANTUM THEORY, Dover Press

Lecturer Paul Brumer, Rm: LM 421B, Ph: 416-978-3569
Title CHM426H Polymer Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM 1300H)
Schedule 2 lectures
1 tutorials
Topics Scope of polymer chemistry. Organic and inorganic polymers. Synthesis and characterization of polymers. Polymers as advanced materials. Polymers in solution: Flory-Huggins theory. Polymers in the solid state: crystalline and amorphous polymers, the effects of the glass transition on polymer properties, mechanical properties of polymer.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM220H/222H/225Y, CHM247H/249H
Recommended: CHM325H
Text

Required:

P.C. Painter and M.M. Coleman, Essentials of Polymer Science and Engineering, May 2008, ISBN 978-1-932078-75-6

Lecturer Mitchell Winnik, Rm: LM 520, Ph: 416-978-6495 / fax 416-978-0541
Eugenia Kumacheva, Rm: LM 627, Ph: 416-978-3576
Title CHM427H Statistical Mechanics (Graduate Course: CHM1480H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics The course will examine and develop the formalism of statistical mechanics with a view to describing the thermodynamics and structure of gases and liquids. The course will begin with an elementary treatment of the way in which equilibrium is approached in macroscopic systems. After a review of ensemble theory and fluctuations, these ideas will be applied to the structure of liquids (through distribution function theory) and to phase transitions.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM326H, CHM328H
Text

Recommended:

McQuarrie, STATISTICAL MECHANICS, University Science Books.

Lecturer Raymond Kapral, Rm: LM 421C, Ph: 416-978-6106
Course Outline CHM427H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM432H Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis (Graduate Course: CHM1204H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Structure, bonding, and reactions of organometallic compounds, with emphasis on basic mechanisms, and industrial processes. Addition, metalation, substitution, elimination, industrially important catalytic cycles, and electrophilic reactions are considered on a mechanistic basis. Although this course is concerned primarily with transition metal organometallic chemistry, the properties of s and p block organometallics may be considered.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM338H
Recommended: CHM348H
Text

Required:

R. Crabtree, THE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY OF THE TRANSITION METALS 6th ed, Wiley Interscience A no-cost e-book version is available through the UofT site licence with the publisher at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/book/10.1002...

Lecturer Robert Morris, Rm: DB 344, Ph: 416-978-6962
Course Outline CHM432H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM434H Advanced Materials Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM1206H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics This course is designed as a natural follow-up to Materials Chemistry, which focused on the synthesis-structure-property-function relations of selected classes of inorganic and polymer materials. In this course we will be primarily concerned with newer methods of synthesizing inorganic solids with properties and functions specifically tailored for a particular use. The subject matter will cover aspects of modern materials chemistry. Topics are selected to introduce the student to current highlights of materials chemistry, an emerging sub-discipline of chemistry. The interrelationship of synthesis to property and function will be critically examined and how these create opportunities for new materials applications and technologies.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM325H, CHM338H
Text

Required:

L. Smart and E. Moore, SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY, AN INTRODUCTION, 4th ed., 2012, CRC Press

Reference:

A.R. West, SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY AND ITS APPLICATIONS, Wiley, 1997

D.W. Bruce, D. O’Hare, INORGANIC MATERIALS, Wiley, 1997

L.V. Interrante, M.J. Hampden-Smith, CHEMISTRY OF ADVANCED MATERIALS, Wiley VCH, 1998

G.A. Ozin and A.C. Arsenault, L. Cademartiri, NANOCHEMISTRY: A Chemical Approach to Nanomaterials, 2nd ed, RSC, 2009

L. Cademartiri, G.A. Ozin, Concepts of Nanochemistry, Wiley-VCH, 2009

Lecturer Geoffrey Ozin, Rm: LM 326, Ph: 416-978-2082 / fax 416-971-2011
Course Outline CHM434H1 - OUTLINE - Fall 2017.pdf
Title CHM437H Bioinorganic Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM1263H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Essential elements, harmful elements, naturally occurring ligands, chelating ligands, ligands used in chelate therapy, functions of metals, principles of bioinorganic coordination chemistry, template effect, spontaneous self-assembly, properties of biological molecules, transport of metal ions, control and utilization of metal-ion concentrations, DNA binding, enzymes exploiting acid catalysis, NMR studies, developing artificial hydrolytic metalloenzymes, zinc fingers, electron transfer and energy sources for life, iron-sulfur proteins, Mossbauer spectroscopy, hydrogenases, nitrogenase, atom and group transfer chemistry, redox enzymes, biomineralization, radiopharmaceuticals.
Background Exclusions: CHM333H5, CHMD69H3
Pre-requisites: CHM238Y
Strongly Recommended: CHM338H
Recommended: CHM347H/379H
Text

Required:

TBA

Recommended:

TBA

Lecturer Jik Chin, Rm: DB 462, Ph: 416-946-7335 / fax 416-978-7113
Course Outline CHM437H1 - OUTLINE - Winter 2018.pdf
Title CHM440H The Synthesis of Modern Pharmaceutical Agents (Graduate Course: CHM1004H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Development of a modern drug is a complicated process that demands improved methods for selective transformations of organic molecules. Typically, medicinal chemistry efforts during the discovery stage focus on generating valuable structure/activity relationships for the compounds that are being screened for activity. At this stage, the main synthetic challenges pertain to the selective transformations of available building blocks into diversely functionalized derivatives. At the next stage, process chemists take over the project and face completely different issues that relate to finding the shortest and most efficient route to the candidate identified during the medicinal chemistry part of the campaign. The present course provides an overview of reactions that are being used at different stages of the drug development process. Using representative examples from the literature, we will concentrate on synthesis of complex heterocyclic compounds.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM342H
Text

Recommended:

Clayden et al., ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, Oxford Press 2004, ISBN 01985013466

Lecturer Mark Lautens, Rm: DB 359, Ph: 416-978-6083
Title CHM441H Spectroscopic Analysis in Organic Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM1005H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Notes: 20 lab hours (Sept-Nov)
Topics The application of spectroscopic methods available to graduate students and researchers (IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR , MS, UV) will be discussed. Practical aspects of each method will be emphasized. Students will learn how to operate IR, UV, NMR and MS instruments and will be required to run spectra for assigned organic molecules.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM249H, CHM343H
Text

Required:

Optional text 1: Pavia, Introduction to Spectroscopy, 4th Ed., Brooks/Cole, 2009.

Optional text 2: Silverstein, Spectroscopic Identification of Organic Compounds, 7th Ed., Wiley, 2005.

Lab Fee This course charges a lab fee.
Lecturer Mark Taylor, Rm: LM 622A, Ph: 416-946-0571
TBA
Lab Instructor TBA
Title CHM443H Physical Organic Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM1003H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics Modern physical organic chemistry. Noncovalent binding forces, solutions, and molecular recognition. Electronic structure theory and computational techniques. Reaction mechanisms: experimental probes and reactive intermediates, including carbenes and radicals. Photophysics and photochemistry of organic compounds.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM220H/222H/225Y, CHM348H
Text

Recommended:

TBA

Lecturer TBA
Title CHM446H Organic Materials Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM1304H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics This course covers design, synthesis, characterization and application of organic materials. Emphasis is placed on clasic examples of organic materials including semiconducting polymers, molecular devices, self assembled systems, and bioconjugates, as well as recent advances from the literature.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM247H/CHM249H, CHM220H/222H/225Y
Recommended preparation: CHM325H, CHM342H/CHM343H
Lecturer TBA
Title CHM447H Bio-organic Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM1006H)
Schedule 2 lectures
Topics The purpose of the course is to provide a mechanistic understanding of biochemical reactions in terms of organic chemical knowledge. Thus, this course is intended for students with a strong background in organic chemistry, obtained in our third year courses, CHM347 (organic chemistry of biological compounds) and CHM348 (organic reaction mechanisms) as well as CHM379 or another biochemistry course. Building on this background, the subject matter includes illustrations of biochemical reactions and systems that are addressed in mechanistic terms. The topics are chosen to illustrate a wide range of mechanistic and structural questions and approaches to their solutions: general theories of reactions, stress and strain, covalent intermediates and coenzymes, stereoelectronic control, enantiotopic distinctions and chiral environments, chiral methyl for stereochemical analysis, kinetic principles and survey of bisubstrate kinetics and inhibition, inhibitors, phosphates and nucleases. The course includes midterm and final examinations as well as critical essays on assigned topics that are done independently.
Background Pre-requisites: CHM347H, CHM348H
Text

Recommended:

Voet and Voet, BIOCHEMISTRY, 4th ed, 2011, Wiley

Lecturer Mark Nitz, Rm: DB 459, Ph: 416-946-0640
Title CHM479H Biological Chemistry (Graduate Course: CHM1008H)
Topics An in depth examination of biological systems at the molecular level. Several complex, multi-component molecular machines with a central role in life will be examined. For each system studied, the focus will be on understanding the chemical mechanisms that underlie the biological activities, and how these processes fit into a cellular context.
Background Pre-requisites: BCH210H/BCH242Y, CHM347H, CHM348H
Lecturer Deborah Zamble, Rm: DB 443, Ph: 416-978-3568
Course Weblink Course Info
Title CHM499Y Introduction to Chemistry Research
Schedule 240 labs
Notes: Enrolment in this course is limited and application for admission should be made to the Department in the preceding Winter Session, i.e., not later than the Friday before Reading Week. The application form may be filled out electronically and a hard copy submitted to the undergraduate office.
Topics An experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are expected to spend approximately 240 hours during the academic year on their research problem. All students following the Chemistry Specialist program, or one of the joint specialist programs involving Chemistry (Biological Chemistry, Chemical Physics, Materials Science, Environmental Chemistry) are strongly encouraged to consider taking this course. The opportunity for doing original work in one of the branches of chemistry in the atmosphere of a research laboratory is a very valuable one, not only for prospective graduate work, but also for many other endeavours.

Projects in the areas of environmental, analytical, physical, inorganic, materials, organic and biological chemistry are offered. Students are encouraged to visit the faculty’s website prior to submission of their applications to get some ideas of the group research and indicate their choice of areas of interest on the application. However, it is not required that a student has signed up with a research faculty when submitting an application. Only students who are offered admission will be required to interview and find a research supervisor.

Background Pre-requisites: Permission of the department. Minimum CGPA of 3.0. Research positions are limited. Students with strong background in courses in the sub-discipline of research interest will be given preference.